Anaesthetics

If your pet comes in for a surgical or medical procedure it is highly likely they will require a general anaesthetic or deep sedation.

Anaesthesia is an induced state of temporary unconsciousness, causing deep muscle relaxation, unawareness (memory loss) and relief from pain.

Even non painful/minor procedures may require a sedation or anaesthetic if the patient is particularly wriggly or highly stressed, as you can't explain to them what you're doing or expect them to stay still!

Is it Safe?

Every anaesthetic carries some risk. However with modern drugs, constant monitoring and pre operation blood testing, we can minimise this as much as possible and tailor each anaesthetic to the animal's individual needs.

Many of the drugs that we use in veterinary anaesthesia are also the same drugs used to anaesthetise people.

What is the pre anaesthetic blood profile?

We recommend that animals over 8 years old have a pre anaesthetic blood test before they undergo an anaesthetic.

This carries out a screen of liver and kidney function, and a full haematology (blood count) which tells us if your pet has kidney or liver disease, is dehydrated or anaemic.

Monitoring

All animals under anaesthesia have their vital signs constantly monitored by a Veterinary Nurse, acting under the direct supervision of a Veterinary Surgeon. An experienced nurse who is literally 'on the pulse' is the most valuable piece of monitoring equipment you can have!

Anaesthetic Equipment

We have the following anaesthetic equipment available to us:

  • Pulse Oximetry - A measurement of Oxygen saturation in the blood
  • Blood Pressure
  • Bair Hugger - Patient warming device with special blankets to maintain a constant temperature
  • ECG - Electrocardiogram, traces the electrical activity of the heart
  • Oesophageal stethoscopes - a tube that allows us to constantly listen to the heart/lungs without disturbing the surgical drapes

Bair Hugger

All animals under anaesthesia have their vital signs constantly monitored by a Veterinary Nurse, acting under the direct supervision of a Veterinary Surgeon. An experienced nurse who is literally 'on the pulse' is the most valuable piece of monitoring equipment you can have! One of the aids we have during surgery is the BAIR HUGGER which is a patient warming device with special blankets to maintain a constant temperature.